To Float Like a Mangrove Pod

Avicennia marina, Gray Mangrove

A Mangrove seed pod floats through rivers, oceans and bays until it finds a place to land. When it does land, it tries to bury it’s roots down to grow. Unfortunately, it can’t grow everywhere and the brave little seed pods perish upon foreign land. Now, not to be dramatic or anything, but I feel a strange connection to the fate of these pods. I’ve floated across the skies to many different countries, waiting for the one that I could sink my roots down into. Of the places I have been, none have been able to hold me for long enough for roots to grow. There has never been the right combination of whatever’s to keep me in one place. Yet, here I stand on Australian sand, and unlike the Mangrove pods that can’t grow there, I feel my roots slipping down. 

Yesterday, my pen pal and I went for a walk in the Booderee National Forest on a stretch of sand called Green Patch. The sky was cloudy, but the ocean was so ferociously turquoise that it could not hide it’s translucent hues. Our feet, bare in the white sand, walked across sedimentary rocks lined with colors leaching through the soil by the gum trees. And the gum trees grow all the way down to the sea, kissing the salty air with their long fragrant leaves and twisting branches. 


We walk in silence mostly, followed by bursts of random stories usually pertaining to the world around us. As a marine biologist, I often find B stooped down over a tide pool, flipping over rocks or looking for anenomes. This world is very alive for her, and her enthusiasm for the creatures is nearly impossible not to let overtake you. I find a smile on my face every time I check. As the reality of Australia being a home for me settles in, I allow myself to become excited about a place. The desire that is necessary to fall in love with something is there, and I find myself opening to the endless list of uncertainty. 

Our nature count for the day tallies up quickly. We chance upon three separate Wallabies grazing along the beach. The tide pools are full of an assortment of names I can no longer remember, and the sky is full of colorful lorikeets and parrots.  All of this is only a 2 hour drive south from where I plan to reside. It is hard not to be excited about the inevitable approach of Summer. I count myself lucky to be experiencing my third spring of the year, cuddled up in an Australian jumper with my Australian friend. Below are some more photos from our day.

Actinia tenebrosa, Red waratah anenome

Neptune’s Necklace

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s